Research Pricing (And Set Fair Starting Prices): Before setting prices for each item, research your local Craigslist website and (if possible) nearby yard sales to get a sense of how to price them. Remember that many buyers will try to haggle – so set prices a bit higher than your bottom dollar, but not so high that you’ll scare off first bids. 10% to 15% is a good rule of thumb. Consider bunching low-value items, such as old CDs, into lots of five or 10, or offer x-for-$y deals.
Rakuten: With over 2,500 stores to choose from, Rakuten (formerly known as Ebates) is a leader in the cash back industry. To date, Rakuten has paid its members over $1 billion in cash back. You can shop directly through Rakuten by visiting the website and choosing your store, or you can install the browser extension in your browser. Read DollarSprout’s Rakuten review here.
Storage. Depending on how big your business gets, you’ll need ample room to store the books. You can’t get lazy or disorganized about it, either. You have to keep the books in good condition, and you need to be able to find them when someone wants them. For instance, if you list a book in “like new” condition, and then the pages get smashed during storage, you’ll be in a bind if someone places an order before you realize what happened.
Write academic papers. There are lots of people, from middle school students to people working on their doctorate, who have more work than they can handle. You can get paid to do it for them! Writing other people's school papers can be a great way to make money if you're a good writer and willing to learn lots of different subjects. There are many companies that provide this service for which you can work if this is what you want to do.

You'll find my course and class recommendations for training for work at home. Many I have taken myself. And some even offer free online mini-courses so that you can get a feel for a career before you head off in that direction. As well - I love covering the topics of ways to make money online and SAVE money that don't necessarily fall under the "employment" umbrella - but can earn extra cash. I'm on a budget and trying to pay off debt - just like most people. So whenever I come across a great new way to save or earn cash -- you better believe I am going to share it with you. And I promise... no crazy "at home stuffing envelopes" nonsense!

Do you need inspiration? Not sure what you could be doing? From social media promotion to ghostwriting, from editing to customer service, and a myriad of other options, you might be surprised how many different types of jobs are available on a remote basis. In fact, many jobs that were traditionally done in an office are increasingly being done by remote employees or ​contractors working off-site.


Advertising. You’ll need to get the word out about your sewing business, and one of the best places to start is with your friends and neighbors. Make sure they are all aware of your services and are willing to pass around your business cards. In addition, you should put up fliers in local fabric stores and get to know the employees so that if someone asks, they’ll be able to refer you. Any business needs a website, and yours will be no exception; you can put up a simple one that outlines what you do, and tells the reader what kinds of prices to expect. Finally, by joining organizations like the American Sewing Guild, you’ll be able to stay in touch with others who are doing the same thing as you.
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