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Create a killer course experience: With your course validated and in the works, you need to figure out how people will take it. Most course creators choose to host their courses from their own websites. This way, they get all the value of bringing customers back to their site on a regular basis. I host my own courses from a subdomain on my own site so I can easily add more. The course experience is incredibly important as well. And after trying most of the solutions, I highly recommend Teachable—an online platform designed specifically for courses.

Not all direct sales is about your online presence, though. There’s a big element of in-person interaction, which why direct sales can be so much fun for so many people. Jennifer Tegnerud is one woman who has a really interesting direct sales success story. She quit her job to be a stay-at-home mom and then decided that she needed to do something “grown up” to keep in touch with her “pre-mom” self and make staying home more feasible. What that turned into is a fascinating success story that you can read about right here. Jennifer works part-time hours as a Stella & Dot Stylist to make a full-time income doing something creative and exciting, that really taps into her strengths and interests.


Research selling prices of items similar to yours. Look up completed sales or current listings of items similar to yours. Find the high- and low-end prices, and price your object around the median price level. If you want your item to sell quickly, price it at the low end. The condition of the item also affects the price. Items in poorer condition should be priced at the lower end. Also, consider how many listings there already are of items similar to yours. If many similar items will be competing with yours, you may have to set the price lower to get the sale.[28]
Robert said he did an average of 4-6 of these gigs per year for a while depending on his schedule and the work involved. The best part is, he charged a flat rate that usually worked out to around $100 per hour. And remember, this was pay he was earning to advise people on the best ways to use social media tools like Facebook and Pinterest to grow their brands.
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