18. CraigsList – Some things don’t ship very well. Other things may make you feel uncomfortable to sell to someone across the country. Anytime you’re selling a large item or something you just don’t want to ship, Craigslist is a great place to go. It’s simple to list your item (again, take good pictures!). If you don’t like the idea of putting your phone number out there, the interested individual can send you a message to your inbox without even getting your email address.
Photos of people can only be sold for commercial use if they've signed a 'model release' that gives you permission to use their image (children need a parent/guardian to sign). Without a release, these photos can still be sold for editorial use, as long as they were taken in a public place – eg, if you submitted a 'breaking news' shot with people in the background. If there's any doubt, always ask permission.
The best part about starting a blog is that it can lead to a sizeable income. It takes a lot of work and dedication, but it’s possible. There are a lot of bloggers who make five or six figures each month. Sounds pretty good, doesn’t it? To make this happen, you’ll need to understand how to reliably (and efficiently) monetize your blog. This article from DollarSprout has some great tips.
This one's theoretically possible; I'm sure someone, somewhere, has been immediately successful. However, these cases are exceptional, and for most IM newbies, immediate success is like winning the lottery. For most of us, building an IM business can go on for weeks, months or even years before results are seen; but, in most cases, you can see some income almost instantly.
As a teen, babysitting was my bread and butter. I would babysit my father’s co-worker’s children, the neighborhood kids, my siblings, as well as children from the church we attended. It was an easy way to make some money, and obviously, I didn’t spend any money on advertising my services. While most of my clients were from word of mouth referrals, I was also able to offer my child care services on the local bulletin board at our church, and I told everyone I wanted to work. 

Accommodate Multiple Forms of Payment: Many deal-seekers carry cash, but you want to accommodate every potential buyer. So, in the days leading up to the event, consider purchasing a point-of-sale system that can accept credit cards. Square is a popular and relatively cost-effective option: it doesn’t cost anything upfront and bundles credit card processing fees into its own per-transaction fees, resulting in a net expense of 2.75% for most transactions (net of $97.25 for every $100 charged). This is a small price to pay to capture the ever-growing cashless consumer demographic. On the day before the sale, visit the bank and grab $100 in small bills and coin rolls to ensure you’ll have enough change for buyers who do prefer cash.
Double check yourself, before you double wreck yourself. Make sure everything you send to a company, whether a résumé, an email or a portfolio, is good to go. Double check your grammar and wording, and for God’s sake use spell check! This is especially important when it comes to the company’s name. Don’t spell their name wrong and be sure to type it how they type it (e.g. Problogger, not Pro Blogger). 

Tips and Tricks From the Work at Home Trenches What to Know Before You Set Sail on the Work-From-Home Ship Most of us know what it feels like to experience total burnout at a job. You’re overworked, underappreciated, your coworkers are inconsiderate and catty, and your boss just keeps piling more onto you already overflowing plate. You come home tired, the house is a mess, the kids are fighting again (really, do they ever stop?), and your husband asks you (unsuspectingly) what’s for dinner. Close your eyes. Grit your teeth. Take all the deep breaths. It’s only a matter of [Click to Read More…]
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